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“Why should we eat it with lead?” To the Supreme Court Nestle.

Nestle
Via:foodnavigator-asia

The Consumer Affairs Ministry had filed a complaint against Nestle India before NCDRC in 2015, using a provision for the first time in nearly three decades of the Consumer Protection Act.

The Supreme Court has now revived the case of the Government against Nestle India. The Supreme Court revived the government’s case in NCDRC against Nestle India on Thursday, in which a damages of Rs 640 crore for alleged unfair business practices, false labeling, and misleading advertisements were sought.

The bench, chaired by Justice DY Chandrachud, said in the report of CFTRI (Central Institute of Technology Research), Institute, Mysuru) where Maggi samples were tested, will be the basis of action.

The top court had earlier banned proceedings before the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission (NCDRC) after challenging Nestle. The Consumer Affairs Ministry had filed a complaint against Nestle India in 2015, using a provision in the nearly three-decade-old Consumer Protection Act before the NCDRC.

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In the same year, food security regulator FSSAI had banned Maggi noodles because it had found an additional level of lead. In samples, it is called “insecure and dangerous” for human consumption.

New Delhi: The Supreme Court on Thursday asked for a compensation of Rs. In the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission (NCDRC) against Nestle India for reviving the government case.

Accusing 640 million unfair business practices, false labeling, and misleading advertisements.

The apex court had stayed the proceedings before the NCDRC on December 16, 2015, and directed the CFTRI (Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysuru) to give its test report before it.

The bench of Justice DY Chandrachud and Hemant Gupta was told by senior advocate Abhishek Manu Singhvi, who was present at Nestle India, that the test report of Mysuru Lab was presented and it was found that the lead content in Maggi noodles was good Was in the way.

Why should we eat with lead in it? “Justice Chandrachud asked Mr. Singhvi, who replied that there was some amount of lead in various other products.

The bench said that CFTRI’s report, where samples of Maggi noodles were tested after the court orders, will form the basis of action against NCDRC.

“We are seeing that the report of CFTRI will be evaluated before the complaint made by NCDRC. It will not be appropriate for the court to pre-empt the jurisdiction of NCDRC … all rights and content of the parties will remain open. “The bench said.

During the hearing, Additional Solicitor General Vikramjit Banerjee, appearing for the Center, said that in view of the Mysuru Lab report, the matter should be returned to the NCDRC and the proceedings should be banned.

Mr. Singhvi said that this case has now become disastrous because the report is in my favor and the presence of MSG (monosodium glutamate) has not been found.

While opposing the withdrawal of the case back to NCDRC with senior advocate Arvind Dattar, he said that nothing has been decided after the Lab report.

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The Bench dismissed the appeal against the Bombay High Court’s order and said that why should we destroy NCDRC power? We will send the lab report to the commission and ask before settling the complaint filed. The ban order of the Indian Food Security Standards Authority (FSSAI) against Nestle’s Maggie Noodle will be heard later.

The Consumer Affairs Ministry had filed a complaint against Nestle India before NCDRC in 2015, using a provision for the first time in nearly three decades of the Consumer Protection Act.

It filed complaints against Nestle for improper business practices related to Maggi noodles products and false labeling to harm Indian consumers.

It was for the first time that the government had taken action under Section 12-1 of the Consumer Protection Act, under which both the Center and the states have the powers to file a complaint.

In the petition filed before NCDRC, the Ministry had alleged that Nestle India misled the consumers claiming that its Maggie noodle was healthy – “Taste B Healthy Bhai”.

Nestle had to withdraw its instant noodles brand Maggi from the market on MSG’s high lead content and appearance allegations.

Food safety regulator FSSAI had banned Maggie noodles after samples were found in excess of lead, which it termed “unsafe and dangerous” for human consumption.

FSSAI also said that Nestle has violated the labeling rules on the taste-enhancing ‘MSG’ and has ordered the company to submit its compliance report to its orders.

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